Hypothesis Statement and Concept Background( Sensor Group)

Hypothesis Statement

Urban environment is a complex one, it involves all kinds of environmental factors and all the factors are perceived by our human body consciously or unconsciously. In our perspective, urban environment are primarily formed by buildings and streets, it cares more about traffic and commercial efficiency and cares little about how people feel in such an environment. In this project, we link the environmental factors to biometric factors and trying to find what environmental factors affect people’s body and feeling the most. By collecting the data both inside and outside, we will define some comfortable and uncomfortable zones within the city area.

Because anxiety is a much easier thing to measure, so instead of finding the comfort zone directly, we tend to measure the anxiety caused by the environment. When someone in a space which causes anxiety, a lot of biometric reactions will occur. At the same time, we collect the environmental and biometric data to compare the relationship between them so that we can find out some specific correlation. Measure anxiety bases on a hedonic model that can weigh different environmental factors. By adjusting the weight of the biometric and environmental factors repeatedly, we can find out which factor are more impactful than the others.  Then the model can be develop and optimized through these processes.

Different types of people will have different feelings of the same space. We can get more people involved into the project , so their different responses to the spaces can be a really powerful tool to help people understand the city context. Even within a same type of people, they may not have a consensus of the same space, their disputed feeling can also be an interesting part to look into.

By doing that, the finding will should interrogate the relationships between comfort, city form, and environmental conditions.  And the prototype will serve as a mechanism to design and look at the city through the interrelations between space, environment and bodily affects.

Updated on 10/27/2013

Concept Background

City far more complex than we used to think. It contains a lot of aspects of factors such as demographic patterns, cultural differences, the infrastructure etc. Our group are interested in a specific part of them: the city environment. The city environment has a lot of factors, some of them and their impacts are evident and clear, some of the them are potential factor, we know they exist, but we do not know how we correspond to that factor and what impact the factor will have. In this sense, we live in a city which we don’t really know.

A lot of bureaus and organization are doing monitoring job of the city environment. They publish their data and finding everyday, they help people to understand the potential hazard of the environmental factors and give people recommendations. And the designer are telling the public what good impacts the building and space will have before the completion of it. But the public have no such an experience to tell the good or bad space.

People have done a lot of research on the impacts of the city environment, space. But they do not know the impact intuitively. It’s not the public’s fault, it is because of the lack of education and knowledge. So the goal of out project team is to interrogate the relationships between comfort, city form, and environmental conditions and finally help people know how their bodily reactions will be under such an environment.

Updated on 10/27/2013

Characteristics and Guidelines of Great Neighborhoods

Characteristics and Guidelines of Great Neighborhoods

http://jpprojectthree.blogspot.com/2013/01/define-liveable-neighbourhood.html

A neighborhood can be based on a specific plan or the result of a more organic process.

Neighborhoods of different kinds are eligible — downtown, urban, suburban, exurban, town, small village — but should have a definable sense of boundary.

Neighborhoods selected for a Great Neighborhood designation must be at least 10 years old.

Description of the Neighborhood

It is important to identify the geographic, demographic, and social characteristics of the neighborhood. Tell us about its location (i.e. urban, suburban, rural, etc.), density (i.e. dwelling units per acre), or street layout and connectivity; economic, social, and ethnic diversity; and functionality (i.e. residential, commercial, retail, etc.). We also want to know whether a plan or specific planning efforts contributed to or sustained the character of the neighborhood, or if the neighborhood formed more organically and not through a formal planning process.

Neighborhood Form and Composition

How does the neighborhood …

  • Capitalize on building design, scale, architecture, and proportionality to create interesting visual experiences, vistas, or other qualities?
  • Accommodate multiple users and provide access (via walking, bicycling, or public transit) to multiple destinations that serve its residents?
  • Foster social interaction and create a sense of community and neighborliness?
  • Promote security from crime is made safe for children and other users (i.e. traffic calming, other measures)?
  • Use, protect, and enhance the environment and natural features?

Neighborhood Character and Personality

How does the neighborhood …

  • Reflect the community’s local character and set itself apart from other neighborhoods?
  • Retain, interpret, and use local history to help create a sense of place?

Neighborhood Environment and Sustainable Practices

How does the neighborhood …

  • Promote or protect air and water quality, protect groundwater resources, and respond to the growing threat of climate change? What forms of “green infrastructure” are used (e.g., local tree cover mitigating heat gain)?
  • Utilize measures or practices to protect or enhance local biodiversity or the local environment?

Great Neighborhoods – Characteristics and Guidelines for Designation

A neighborhood can be based on a specific plan or the result of a more organic process. Neighborhoods of different kinds are eligible — downtown, urban, suburban, exurban, town, small village — but should have a definable sense of boundary. Neighborhoods selected for a Great Neighborhood designation must be at least 10 years old.

Characteristics of a Great Neighborhood include:

  1. Has a variety of functional attributes that contribute to a resident’s day-to-day living (i.e. residential, commercial, or mixed-uses).
  1. Accommodates multi-modal transportation (i.e. pedestrians, bicyclists, drivers).
  1. Has design and architectural features that are visually interesting.
  1. Encourages human contact and social activities.
  1. Promotes community involvement and maintains a secure environment.
  1. Promotes sustainability and responds to climatic demands.
  1. Has a memorable character.

Description of the Neighborhood

  1. When was the neighborhood first settled?
  1. Where is the neighborhood located: in a downtown, urban area, suburb, exurban area (i.e., on the fringes of a metropolitan area), village, or small town? What is the neighborhood’s approximate density (e.g., in dwelling units per acre, or other)?
  1. What is the neighborhood’s location, its physical extent, and layout?  What are the boundaries of the neighborhood? Are these boundaries formal, defined by an institution or jurisdiction (i.e., wards or other political boundaries, neighborhood associations, other entities) or is the neighborhood defined informally?
  1. How large a geographic area does the neighborhood encompass (number of blocks, acres, or other measurement)?
  1. What is the layout (e.g., grid, curvilinear) of the streets? Is there street connectivity; is it easy to get from one place to another by car, foot, or bike within or beyond the neighborhood without going far out of one’s way?
  1. What is the mix of residential, commercial, retail and other uses?
  1. What activities and facilities support everyday life (e.g., housing, schools, stores, parks, green space, businesses, churches, public or private facilities, common streets, transit, etc.)?
  1. Is there diversity amongst the residents, including economic, social, ethnic, and demographic? Describe the neighborhood’s homogeneity or heterogeneity in those terms.
  1. How has a plan or planning contributed to or sustained the character of the neighborhood? Or did the neighborhood form more organically and not through a formal planning process?

Guidelines for Great Neighborhoods

1.0 Neighborhood Form and Composition

1.1 Does the neighborhood have an easily discernable locale? What are its borders?

1.2 How is the neighborhood fitted to its natural setting and the surrounding environs?

1.3 What is the proximity between different places in the neighborhood? Are these places within walking or biking distances? Does walking or bicycling within the neighborhood serve multiple purposes? Describe (access to transit, parks, public spaces, shopping, schools, etc.). How are pedestrians and bicyclists accommodated (sidewalks, paths or trails, designated bike lanes, share-the-road signage, etc.).

1.4 How does the neighborhood foster social interaction and promote human contact? How is a sense of community and neighborliness created?

1.5 Does the neighborhood promote security from crime, and is it perceived as safe? How are streets made safe for children and other users (e.g., traffic calming, other measures)?

1.6 Is there consistency of scale between buildings (i.e., are buildings proportional to one another)?

2.0 Neighborhood Character and Personality

2.1 What makes the neighborhood stand out? What makes it extraordinary or memorable? What elements, features, and details reflect the community’s local character and set the neighborhood apart from other neighborhoods?

2.2 Does the neighborhood provide interesting visual experiences, vistas, natural features, or other qualities?

2.3 How does the architecture of houses and other buildings create visual interest? Are the houses and buildings designed and scaled for pedestrians?

2.4 How is local history retained, interpreted, and used to help create a sense of place?

2.5 How has the neighborhood adapted to change? Include specific examples.

3.0  Neighborhood Environment and Sustainable Practices

3.1 How does the neighborhood respond to the growing threat of climate change? (e.g., local tree cover mitigating heat gain)?

3.2 How does the neighborhood promote or protect air and water quality, protect groundwater resources if present, and minimize or manage stormwater runoff? Is there any form of “green infrastructure”?

3.3 What measures or practices exist to protect or enhance local biodiversity or the local environment?